Math: The problematic solution

I think each one of us has already felt unhappy, unacknowledged, or at least misunderstood, at some point in our short lives. And for whatever reason that may be, it feels awful.

I would like to stress on the last one, “misunderstood” because it drags on a friend, Frustration.
I mean, we all met Frustration when we just couldn’t grasp a Math problem. But then something clicked and suddenly you felt overjoyed because this foreign notion and your brain turned out to be compatible.

Now imagine you are a student again. It’s Math class. If understanding a problem filled you up with such glee, then imagine understanding someone’s pain, or better still, your own pain.

Now change your point of view. Imagine you are the Math teacher. And you have to explain to your most beloved student (don’t worry though, you’re not favoring them) a very abstract notion. And you’ve tried to bring it about in so many different ways, but it’s just not possible. They don’t get it, it’s almost like they are consciously refusing to understand.
Frustration.

Now, the final perspective you are to take, is a more complex one. It’s a dual perspective. Imagine you are both the professor and the pupil. And you need to explain to others a concept you have never even mastered, one that you are still unable to understand yourself.
Frustration and all his friends

I feel there is no other word that englobes one’s feeling as much as this one. To feel as though there is a void inside of one’s soul, because a loved one simply does not understand. It’s painful. It’s painful to live, and it’s painful to realize.

And yet, we hang on, and we try, just one more time… For fixing your problem is not what you want. You want to be understood. And even though it doesn’t solve anything, somehow it helps. Because maybe the real problem isn’t Math, but it’s feeling as though your beloved student finally got it, even if they don’t turn out to be an engineer.


This is a link I found. It’s very expressive and I think anyone can identify to it, without even having experienced it.

http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/12/explaining-my-depression/?utm_content=buffer9d0e2&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s